(Stephen) Grover Cleveland
Served 1885-1889, 1893-1897

Stephen Grover Cleveland was born March 18, 1837, in Caldwell, New Jersey.

One of nine children of a Presbyterian minister, was raised in upstate New York. As a lawyer in Buffalo, he became notable for his concentration and hard work. At 44, running as a reformer, he was elected Mayor of Buffalo in 1881, and later, Governor of New York.

Cleveland was the only President to serve two nonconsecutive terms that were not back to back. He was thus America’s 22nd and 24th President. In 1884, he won as the Democratic Party nominee. His first Vice President was Thomas A. Hendricks. In 1888, Benjamin Harrison defeated him for re-election. Then in 1892, he defeated Harrison for re-election. His second Vice President was Adlai E. Stevenson.

During his term, Utah was the 45th state to join the Union.

Cleveland was considered stubborn, as he did not listen to advice and did not like to compromise. He surprised the nation when he married Frances Folsom in the White House on June 2, 1886. He was 49; she was 21 and became the youngest first lady in the history of the White House. They had a lasting marriage that produced five children, one of whom had a candy bar named for her, Baby Ruth.

Cleveland earned the nickname “Uncle Jumbo” because of his big size; others called him “Grover the Good.”

After leaving office for the second time, the Clevelands settled in Princeton, New Jersey, where he took an active interest in Princeton University and became a trustee in 1901. His tireless efforts led to a greater respect and admiration of the university and of the Association of Presidents of Life Insurance Companies.

Cleveland died in Princeton, New Jersey, June 24, 1908.

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1 Comment

  1. J M M
    September 17, 2015

    “Cleveland was the only President to serve two nonconsecutive terms that were not back to back.”

    Nonconsecutive means that they were not back to back. He either served two nonconsecutive terms or two terms that were not back to back. Saying both is redundant.

    Reply

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